Ramblings blade_runner_1

Published on October 21st, 2012 | by Michaela Buckley

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Migrated My own Interior World

“All those moments will be lost like tears in rain. Time to die.”

Blade Runner, released in 1982 features a future Earth left behind in dystopia after the colonisation of humans, where outer colony androids are illegal on Earth and must be destroyed.

The film is one of the most dominant sci-fi movies of all time, having been directed by Ridley Scott and based on Philip K. Dick’s book “Do Androids dream of Electric Sheep?” it is cited as a feat of cinematography and musical score.

It’s certainly one of my favourite films, despite my peers consensus of it being slow paced and boring, however to me it means much more than an action sci-fi film.

There are many aspects of the film that are frequently unnoticed, such as the attention to detail on environmental shots, the buildings are mostly pieces of set from other films such as Star Wars and Alien, the in-film advertisements are relevant to the cultural lifestyles of the dribbling mass that occupy Earth, and the philosophical and psychological questions the story imposes on you negate all argument of inanity, because this is from a time before animé and cyberpunk, it’s a time when A.I. made us all rethink what it is to be human, and to condemn the inhumane.

One of the main areas where the influence of Dick is prevalent, even today, is in video games. Take Bioshock, it’s a dystopian libertarian society cut off from the forefront of humanity, if it weren’t for the ideas of where morality lies in political movements concerning true freedom of speech and technology, which is found throughout Dick’s books long before any writers I can think of, then there would be no Bioshock.

Scott’s infamous set design at its best.

 

This is only just from the books, the visualisation noted in Ridley’s Blade Runner tells more for Snatcher, Final Fantasy VII and Flashback than the respective cultures they originate from.

The noir-esque atmosphere that envelops the film is further fueled by the lengthy scenes and downplayed dialogue and action, the sets appear large and realistic, nor for one moment is the viewer left out of the world Scott has created.

The depths in story development are just not seen here, there is a little interaction, but a lot can be derived from it, “the better you look, the more you see” as the film focuses more on the suggestive symbolism.
This often leads one to question more than is supposed and that which is essentially necessary; the director took a lot of liberties with the story.

There isn’t Flash Bang explosive action, There’s not mindblowing romance scenes or witty catchphrases from the comic relief character.

What it is, is a piece of cinema that walks through Morality, Theology and Social Awareness, charging the viewer with thought evoking ideas that last longer than the credits.
It’s more than can be said for many other films that have been released since.

The flying cars in Blade Runner are known as “Spinners”

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